Education

Teaching and Technology

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It was definitely an "apple for the teacher" that captivated then student teacher
Cynthia Kaye. While working toward an early education degree at Florida State University more than 20 years ago, Kaye interned in a fourth grade classroom equipped with one of the early Apple IIe computers.

Within weeks, Kaye had loaded all her curriculum onto the computer, snagged an unused model from the class next door and had her students at the keyboard. "The kids just lit up. They were so engaged and excited. They”d clap when I came in," she recalls. After all, computers in the classroom were almost "newfangled" technology back in the day.

Kaye”s mentor teacher had the best advice, telling Kaye that her calling was to bring technology to teachers and students. Now, as president and chief executive office of Logical Choice Technologies, Kaye is living her dream. "I want to make an impact on the next generation. I want to help change the way we teach and learn."

Taking Technology to School
Kaye launched Logical Choice in 1994. Based in Lawrenceville, Logical Choice is the very literal marriage of educational theory and technology; Cynthia”s husband Ron is the company”s chief technology officer. From day one, the mission was to bring effective technologies to the classroom.

In the beginning, "technology" meant computers and networking. "But we were always looking for what was next and what was better," Kaye adds.

Six years ago, she found it in the interactive technologies of Promethean. Based in the United Kingdom, Promethean makes interactive whiteboard (IWB) teaching systems and integrated student response systems, creating ActivClasrooms. "I have such a passion for this technology. I was just this small Georgia company, and I flew to the U.K. and told them, ?I want to sell your product nationwide.” I had no idea how we were going to do it, but they liked my exhilaration and gave me 10 states." She got the pick of the liter, so to speak, major population centers like Florida, California and New York, as well as Georgia.

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